Events

Defrocked United Methodist Minister Rev. Frank Schaefer to Preach at First United Methodist Church of Boulder on March 23rd

First United Methodist Church of Boulder (FUMC) is honored to have Rev. Frank Schaefer as their guest preacher on Sunday March 23rd. His sermon is titled “Of Sacred Worth and Human Dignity “ based on John 4:5-29. Schaefer is a former ordained minister of the United Methodist Church who was tried by a United Methodist court for officiating his son’s same-sex marriage in December 2013. He was defrocked after his refusal to uphold the Book of Discipline, which requires him to denounce gay marriage rights. Now a United Methodist lay person, speaker and activist, he continues to advocate for human rights across the country.

FUMC is a part of a network of congregations and pastors who have vowed a higher loyalty to “Biblical obedience” which mandates embracing the marginalized and affirming the value of all of God’s children rather than following discriminatory rules of the institutional church. While they began somewhat underground, many of these United Methodists, particularly in the western part of the United States, have become more and more emboldened to act as their consciences demand. FUMC Boulder pastors, Joe Agne and Pat Bruns, are leaders in this movement, organizing other progressives, stating clearly our congregation’s positions to the public and to our own Bishop, and taking actions such as inviting Rev. Frank Schaefer to preach from our pulpit and experience the support of our congregation and community.

“It is a special privilege to welcome Frank Schaefer and his spouse Brigette to First United Methodist Church of Boulder. Last December the Eastern Pennsylvania Conference of the United Methodist Church withdrew Frank’s ordination. This happened right before Christmas, that special season where we celebrate God’s presence coming into the world in ways that embraces all people everywhere. Our denomination needs to work harder at understanding the story of God’s acceptance and love of everyone”, Bruns said about Schaefer’s visit.

Schaefer’s trial and the divide over gay marriage within the United Methodist Church made national headlines. Jean Hodges, a longtime member of FUMC and Regional Director for PFLAG made this comment about the controversy, “I actually am glad to see the media expose the hypocrisy of the UMC with the story of Schaefer, the pastor who presided at his gay son’s ceremony. Just as Jesus instructed his followers to non-violently but cleverly unmask the abusive actions of the power-holders of his day, this publicity may awaken more UM General Conference delegates to acknowledge how atrocious these policies are and how destructive they will be to the future growth of our denomination. Like the extremes of the political parties fighting endlessly in the United States or a family in conflict over differing values, conflict and struggle may be inevitable but speaking the truth to each other and acknowledging the pain we are inflicting is one necessary step if reconciliation is ever to occur.”

Rev. Schaefer will speak with FUMC’s Adult Forum at 9:00 am, preach during worship at 10:30am and lead an open conversation with area clergy and lay leaders in the afternoon from 3:00 pm – 5:00 pm. A wine and cheese reception will be hosted by Out Boulder beginning at 5:00pm.

ABOUT FIRST UNITED METHODIST CHURCH OF BOULDER
First United Methodist Church of Boulder is a welcoming and affirming faith community that compassionately advocates for social justice and equality for all. We joyfully welcome all people of any race, gender, sexual orientation, and faith traditions. Visit us online at fumcboulder.org and at Facebook.com/fumcboulder.

Spirit Hound Distillers at Boettcher Mansion

Mayor Gierlach and Neil Sullivan, Co-Founder of Spirit Hound Distillers, at Boettcher Mansion

Mayor Gierlach and Neil Sullivan, Co-Founder of Spirit Hound Distillers, at Boettcher Mansion

After Governor Hickenlooper came to Nederland last week, I figured the least I could do, was return the favor, attend the holiday celebration at the Governor’s residence, and thank him once again. Upon arrival, I found my way to the bar and asked for a glass of Cabernet. The bartender said they didn’t have any. “Alright, how about a snifter of scotch, neat.” Didn’t have that either. “Martini? Shaken, not stirred?”

As it turns out, the bartender explained that the historic Boettcher Mansion has white marble floors that could get stained, so the owners of the estate only allow clear drinks. He added that the Governor had ordered Spirit Hound Gin for the mansion. I went with that.
[Related Story: Governor Hickenlooper’s visit to Nederland]
Spirit Hound Distillers, are a hand-crafted, micro-distillery, located in Lyons, Colorado, which was impacted by the flood. Here’s the write-up on their gin:

“Quite possibly the smoothest and most unique Gin out there, Spirit Hound Gin is made from only the finest locally sourced botanicals. Juniper berries, anise, fennel, clove, and cinnamon to name a few, are all hand selected from the earth of our sweet town in Lyons. We then craft our Gin using the rare ‘basket’ method, suspending our signature mix of botanicals in a delicate wire mesh basket in the column of the still.  The vaporized spirit then passes through this botanical basket and extracts their flavors. The result: a brighter, lighter gin bursting with aroma and flavor.”

I found this gin to be bright, fresh, smooth – the fennel/anise/clove notes are quite interesting, and compliments the Juniper very well. To that end, I can’t wait to try their whisky when I’m not in a white marbled mansion.
As I made my way around the Governor’s mansion, I had the pleasure of meeting Neil Sullivan, one of the co-founders of Spirit Hound Distillers, and we had a great conversation about the flood, mountain culture and local distinctiveness. Bringing back micro-distilleries, micro-breweries, and local groceries is appealing to me from a community sustainability perspective.
[Related Story: Holiday Celebration at the Governor’s Mansion (last year)]
Lyons and Nederland are similar in many ways – population, strong community volunteerism, proximity to Boulder and federal open space. There are a lot of connections between the two communities and many Nedheads attend RockyGrass at Planet Bluegrass every year. Personally, I’ve been a member of Stonebridge Farm CSA (Community Sponsored Agriculture) in Lyons, for over a decade and have stopped in at local shops on my way home many times (via the scenic route).
I would like to recommend that our Nederland liquor stores and restaurants carry Spirit Hound Distillers whisky and gin, and that Nedheads make a point to order it this holiday season as we look for unique ways for the region to recover from the flood. Click here for a list of where Spirit Hound is sold. Of course, drink responsibly, but if you are given the choice, think about choosing Spirit Hound Distillers. Trust me. You won’t be disappointed.
[Here is a Video Valediction] This is Steve Martin and The Steep Canyon Rangers performing Daddy Played the Banjo at Planet Bluegrass’ RockyGrass (2011) which was recorded on an iPhone by my friend. [What is a Video Valediction?]

Shale Boom or Shale Bubble?

Come to a public discussion of fracking's false economic promise

Deborah Rogers, internationally renowned fracking economics expert,

to present and take questions

Deborah RogersDeborah will speak in three communities: Boulder, Broomfield & Fort Collins

As Front Range communities wrestle with hydraulic fracturing-enabled oil and gas development, residents should know the fracking boom may provide only a short period of oil and gas abundance before collapsing in an economic bust.

Analysis of more than 60,000 oil and gas wells shows:

  • Shale well production declines more rapidly than predicted.
  • The rate of drilling must increase to maintain current production.
  • Shale gas production has become uneconomical in many areas at current prices.
  • Wall Street has played a key behind-the-scenes role in hyping the fracking boom.
  • Industry is largely unwilling to invest in future shale development.

WHO:

Deborah Rogers, co-author of Shale Bubble reports, member of the U.S. Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative, advisor to the U.S. Energy Information Administration, former member of the Advisory Council of the Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas, and Earthworks board member.

WHAT:

An opportunity for the public to learn about and discuss the financial underpinnings of fracking-enabled shale development.

WHERE & WHEN:

Tuesday, October 22nd at 6:30 p.m.
Fort CollinsCouncil Tree Library, 2733 Council Tree Ave.

Wednesday, October 23rd at 6:30pm
BoulderColorado School of Law, Wolf Law Bldg, Rm 204, 2450 Kittredge Loop Rd

Thursday, October 24th at 7pm
BroomfieldLakeshore Room of the Broomfield Community Center, 280 Lamar St.

FOR MORE INFORMATION:

Contacts:

·         All events – Josh Joswick, Earthworks, at 970-903-0876, jjoswick@earthworksaction.org

·         Fort Collins – Kelly Giddens-Unuigbey, Citizens for a Healthy Fort Collins at 503-866-5962, kellygiddens@mac.com

·         Boulder – Kate Johnson, Boulder County Citizens for Community Rights at 303-579-9537, katej2555@msn.com

·         Broomfield – Laura Fronckiewicz, Our Broomfield at 312-533-0525, ourbroomfield@gmail.com

Read the research at www.shalebubble.org

HOSTING ORGANIZATIONS:

Earthworks, Citizens for a Healthy Fort Collins, Boulder County Citizens for Community Rights, and Our Broomfield with East Boulder County United, Erie Rising, Food & Water Watch, Frack Files of Weld County, Frack Free Colorado, Our Broomfield, Our Longmont, Plains Alliance for Clean Air & Water, Protect Our Colorado, Protect Our Loveland, Weld Air and Water, Women’s International League for Peace and Freedom Greeley Chapter, YES on 2H.

THE ORGANIZATIONS BEHIND THE SHALE BUBBLE RESEARCH:

The Energy Policy Forum addresses the serious long-term implications for U.S. energy consumers as America chooses course at the crossroads of potential energy futures.

The Post Carbon Institute provides individuals, communities, businesses, and governments with the resources needed to understand and respond to the interrelated economic, energy, environmental, and equity crises that define the 21st century. We envision a world of resilient communities and re-localized economies that thrive within ecological bounds.

“Our Longmont” to celebrate Global Frackdown 2

Vigil to be held Saturday, October 19, near Trail Ridge Middle School at 5:00 PM

No-fracking-logoOn Saturday, October 19, thousands of people concerned about the threat that drilling and fracking for oil and gas poses to the environment, communities and their shared resources will unite through over 200 actions on six continents for the second annual Global Frackdown. A coordinated international day of action against fracking, the Global Frackdown will gather concerned citizens in over 20 countries and in the US in 25 states who will send a message to elected officials around the world that they want a future powered by clean, renewable energy, not polluting fossil fuels.

Our Health, Our Future, Our Longmont will be holding a vigil as its contribution to Global Frackdown 2.  The gathering is on Harlequin Drive, just north of the Trail Ridge Middle School.  The event will take place between 5:00 PM and 6: 00 PM this Saturday, October 19, 2013.

“Join us for a few moments of music, introspection, inspiration and hope,” said Our Longmont’s Michael Bellmont.

The process of fracking for oil and gas is fraught with dangers.  It threatens the air we breathe, the water we drink, the communities we love and the climate on which we depend.

“Some of those dangers became apparent during the disastrous flooding, particularly in Weld County, home of nearly 20,000 oil and gas wells: oil spills, tanks tipped and overturned, berms that contain contamination washed onto farmland and into waterways in the aftermath of the flooding,” said Kaye Fissinger of Our Longmont.

The vigil will also celebrate the commitment of other communities along the Front Range who have ballot measures calling for either a five-year moratorium or a ban on fracking:  Fort Collins, Broomfield, Boulder and Lafayette.

Give ‘im hell, Grandma, Grandpa!

Colorado Grandparents Tell Governor Not to Frack Their Grandchildren’s Future

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Monday, Sept. 9, 2013

Contact: Russell Mendell, 802-318-1135

Sam Schabacker, 720-295-1036

Colorado Grandparents Tell Governor Not to Frack
Their Grandchildren’s Future

Broomfield, Colo.—Today, concerned grandparents from across Colorado will deliver a letter to tell Governor Hickenlooper and other governors from across the country to say no to fracking (hydraulic fracturing) and yes to a renewable energy future in celebration of National Grandparents’ Day. The delivery is taking place before Governor Hickenlooper’s keynote address to the Western Governor’s Association Policy Forum on Shale Energy Development in Broomfield.

These grandparents will be voicing their concerns over the risks fracking, drilling and related activities pose to all Coloradans health, air, water, land, property values and their special concerns for their grandchildren and great-grandchildren.  They are also demanding that Governor Hickenlooper end his continued use of lawsuits to bully the people of Colorado to accept fracking next to their homes and schools.

“Yesterday I celebrated National Grandparents’ Day with my two grandchildren in Lafayette,” said Merrily Mazza, a retired corporate executive and current member of East Boulder County United. “Today, I’m here to tell Governor Hickenlooper to stop trying to force fracking next to our homes and schools with lawsuits.  My grandchildren deserve a safe, healthy future in Colorado.”

Grandparents representing the five communities (Broomfield, Fort Collins, Loveland, Lafayette and Boulder) who will be voting to protect themselves from fracking this November will be participating in the letter delivery, as well as grandparents from Longmont, who’s community is currently facing two lawsuits from Governor Hickenlooper in order to force fracking next to homes and schools in their city.  Despite gathering thousands of signatures to exercise their right to vote in each of these communities, Governor Hickenlooper has stated he will sue any community that protects themselves from fracking and has not spoken out against the attempts of the oil and gas industry to undermine Coloradans right to vote on fracking in these communities.

“Endangering the health of our grandchildren by contaminating air and water is unacceptable.  We want to work to protect our communities from this dangerous practice.  We are appalled by the lack of leadership in our state government,” said Joan Stern a grandmother with Our Broomfield.

The Western Governor’s Association Policy Forum on Shale Energy Development does not include one voice from residents who have been directly impacted by fracking or have been sued by either Governor Hickenlooper or the industry for exercising their democratic right to vote.  Instead, the Forum appears designed to coach governors and their staffs on how to deflect community concern effectively and use industry messaging to shut out any voices critical of fracking, drilling, wastewater disposal and its associated activities.

“This forum provides yet another disturbing example of how Governor Hickenlooper is the oil and gas industry’s leading cheerleader for fracking while he ignores the people who voted him into office in the first place,” said Kaye Fissinger, a great-grandparent, leading member of Our Longmont and a representative of Protect Our Colorado, the state coalition.

The organizations participating in today’s delivery are: Our Broomfield, Citizens for a Healthy Fort Collins, East Boulder County United, Protect Our Loveland, Frack Free Colorado, Our Longmont and Food & Water Watch.

Full speed ahead for the 1%

The economy is burning down and the 1% don't care.

The economy is burning down and the 1% don’t care.

Detroit’s default and bankruptcy say a great deal about where we’re headed, and that has little to do with the outcome for municipal bond investors or with the national debt picture. Many, many Detroit retirees are watching their pensions blow up in front of their eyes. What will they do? I’d lay odds we’ll have a gray version of Cairo’s Tahrir Square within two years if some entity fails to come to the rescue.

But these folks were mostly if not entirely UNIONIZED. So let ’em eat Alpo, the GOP says. And while we’re at it, we’re going to chop food stamps and vouchers for subsidized housing for the poor. In short, we just don’t give a Tinker’s dam about anyone except the 1% and ourselves, sayeth the buffoons on the wrong side of the aisle and the wrong side of history.

Where might this lead in short order? Assume no other municipality files for Chapter 9. But watch Detroit. See if CURRENT (union) firefighters begin ignoring calls, because there’s no future in it for them. These people are galvanized solid gold human beings, but they do have to eat. Now and in thirty-five years, and later.

What’s the GOP solution? Cut the budget some more. Cut taxes on those who can afford them. Cut the arguing and let us “deliver.” Like John Boehner means “deliver?” Pray that the country finally sees the real cost of the anti, do NOTHING Congressional GOP.

Or else, by the time it does see, climate change will make Detroit pensions completely irrelevant anyway. Oh, Boehner’s clowns are not about to allow anything to get in the way of that little matter, either. Who cares about a few polar bears or coral reefs? These simpletons care only about SUVs, resource extraction, and a 25% return. that’s what made this country GREAT, you know.

So You Say You Want a Revolution?

Social Change Workshop is Modeled After Jesus’ Ministry

First United Methodist Church of Boulder (FUMC) is thrilled to welcome their newest Theologian-in-Residence, Dr. Dorothee Benz, who is offering two FREE workshops to the public on making social change on Saturday July 20th and 27th. The workshops, titled, Power, Protest, Progress: How to Change the World in Two Easy Lessons explore the characteristics of successful social movements and analyze what gives ordinary people the power to make real change happen. “Jesus was all about making social change happen, but following him can be a little daunting – few of us can walk on water or feed 5,000 people. In this class we’ll take a fresh look at Jesus’ ministry and uncover ways in which his most humble acts, like talking to the woman at the well or touching lepers, were more transformative than the flashy fish type miracles and how we can be agents of change in our world today in the same ways”, explains Benz.

Participants will gain an understanding of power based on the writings of scholar-activist Frances Fox Piven, and will draw on examples from the labor movement, the civil rights movement and the Bible.

Reverend Joe Agne, pastor at FUMC says “Benz will help all of us who want to move beyond charity to creating social change – she teaches ways that work. Persons working on fracking, hunger, racism, marriage equality, gun control etc. will find these workshops to be extremely beneficial to their work.”

Dr. Benz is a lifelong activist and organizer. Professionally, she has 25 years experience in social justice communications, and her work as a labor journalist has won numerous awards. She is currently the director of communications at the Center for Constitutional Rights. Benz has a Ph.D. from the City University of New York and her scholarly expertise is in social movements. She is a founding member and chair of Methodists in New Directions (MIND) and one of the architects of the current strategy to transcend the crisis caused by the United Methodist Church’s discrimination against LGBTQ people by organizing networks of clergy and laity to extend their ministries to all couples, gay and straight, on an equal basis in defiance of the rules. She is the winner of the 2012 Gwen and C. Dale White Award from the NY Chapter of the Methodist Federation for Social Action.

Visit fumcboulder.org for more details.

Adult Education Graduation – June 20, 2013

DSC_0134-ThrillOfGraduationThe Adult Education progam of St. Vrain Valley schools had their final graduation ceremony on Thursday June 20, 2013. I believe there were 100 graduates, all obviously thrilled to have their prized diplomas in hand. I heard stories about overcoming adversity to get an education, mothers working and going to school and the powerful support of friends and family. These are people working hard to achieve the American Dream, they embody the basic principles that America was founded on. And they make me very proud. Thank you to the staff for all their work and thanks for inviting me to attend! I hope you like the photos, glad I could be on hand!

Here’s the entire photoset – you can also go directly to the Flickr set by clicking here.

[flickr-gallery mode=”photoset” photoset=”72157634238206045″]

Here’s two of the speeches I heard:

J. Ruben Saenz

J. Ruben Saenz, 2013

J. Ruben Saenz, 2013

I am a Mexican by birth and an American by naturalization. I am originally from Ojinaja Chihuahua Mexico, a small town on the border with Texas, in 1979 I waved goodbye to my country and moved to New Orleans, which is a multicultural city, it was there, that for the first time in my life I was exposed to a wide variety of languages and dialects, that awakened in me a passion for languages and gave me an idea where to direct my steps to.

I came to this school with two purposes: a) when I left my country, even though I had already some academic achievements, I did not bring with me any transcripts to accredit my education, I decided therefore, to get a high school diploma from an accredited American institution. b) Having obtained a High School Diploma entailed also a personal challenge, the intellectual exorcism of certain fears, concerns I had regarding subjects I struggle with when I was young, math to be specific. Those fears have been conquered, it was a challenge that in the end was well worth it, in fact this second time around, it was actually fun.

To retiterate what I mentioned earlier, getting a High School Diploma was most of all a personal challenge, which I was able to accomplish the only way success is achieved in this life, through hard work and effort.. By the way, my appreciation and respect for all the ladies who are graduating tonite, what you’ve accomplished is commendable. It’s all the same, through hard work and effort were you able to juggle school and a job, while at the same time taking care of your families. It goes to prove that you ladies can accomplish anything if you wish: the sky is the limit, and may this High School Diploma be just the beginning of a series of academic achievements.

As for me, I plan to pursue my goal, which is to grow in the exciting field of translation and interpretation, which by the way I also became certified on just two days ago from the Community College of Aurora. It’s a very demanding and challenging career, but at the end of the day, I thrive on challenges.

For us Latinos, the family plays a crucial role in our daily lives; I dare to say that just as it was for me, for many of the Latinos gathered here tonight, we are what we are, thanks to the unwavering support of our respective families. We Latinos, regardless of our ages and whereabouts, in a way, we actually never left home. Even though we did, we’ll always carry wherever we go a piece of it.

And last but not least, I would like to thank on my behalf and that of my fellow students, The Board of Education for this unique academic opportunity offered to us, thanks also to all the teachers, Mrs. Hena, Marcia, Betsy, Rebecca, Susannah. Thanks to all the substitute teachers and volunteers for donating your time and effort. I apologize if I omitted anyone.

In closing, I would like to make a small personal comment regarding the closure of this school, it’s a shame that other adults, minorities as well as young people, won’t be able to benefit from a quality education. This just gives us a glimpse of where the priorities of our leaders are.

On this note congratulations to teachers and students for a job well done and good luck to all in the future.


Douglas Joel Guzman Cerna

Douglas Joel Guzman Cerna - 2013

Douglas Joel Guzman Cerna – 2013

First of all I would like to thank the creator of life, honored guests, fellow graduates, staff and friends. My name is Douglas Joel Guzman Cerna. I’m from Nicaragua and I’m 36 years old. I came to the U.S. when I was 15 years old. I went to school in North Carolina for about three years. Then, I quit school and I started working. I started meeting many people who encouraged me to stay in school but I never listened to them. I would like to thank all those people that have been in my life in so many different ways. Also I would like to thank the negative people too, because they encouraged me to prove them wrong.

I came to Adult Education with the hunger to learn more and to earn a high school diploma, what the inside of me had always wanted. I came to that point and made that decision, and now I did it, with my efforts and the good teachers I had.

My family has been all the people that I have met in my journey of this life. I have been learning from them, from the way they live their lives and the way they treat me. It has been awesome. Even the negative people have helped me because I done what they didn’t expect me to do.

My plans are that one day I will be an architect because I have been learning a lot about construction. As you know when you have the desire to do what you want, you do it; there’s nothing easy but you can do it. Nobody will do it for you. I hope one day that I will reach my goal to be an architect just like I have reached this goal of my high school diploma.

I would like to thank the District Board of Education and the St. Vrain Valley School District for providing the opportunity to earn my high school diploma. Thanks to all and God bless all of us.

 

Berthoud Day Parade 2013 Photos

DSC_0121-council-web

My wife Tammi was part of the team that manned the Happy Tails Dog Ranch and Sun Pony Ranch float in the Berthoud Day Parade on Saturday June 1, 2013. I don’t have details on all the floats so this is just my photos of them as I walked the parade staging area after photographing the Happy Tails Dog Ranch crew. LOTS of great entries! Not the least of these were the equestrians – LOTS of impressive horses, rigs and riders. The Back Country Horseback folks were particularly well-done I felt.

It was fun to see all the agricultural tools – turned out in high style, looking like new in most cases and amusingly aged when not. I refer to the Jeep tow truck. What a fun vehicle!

Anyway, there’s over a hundred images – they’re hosted at Flickr so you can go there and download the 6Mpx images. (Best my little D40 will do.) If you’d like to use any or all of these images, I’d appreciate a credit of “Photo by FreeRangeLongmont” but it’s not mandatory. Please feel free to use without attribution.

Berthoud’s a great town and has a ton of spirit, I hope folks enjoy these images as much as I did taking them. Berthoud Days will be on my schedule next year for sure.

[flickr-gallery mode=”photoset” photoset=”72157633868233511″]

Dr. Anthony Ingraffea on fracking

Baum Professor of Engineering at Cornell University

Dr. Anthony Ingraffea (photo courtesy of ClearingTheFogRadio.org)

What a rare and wonderful event to have a nationally known and highly regarded scientist come to Longmont to speak to a group of concerned citizens!  The day-long conference sponsored by Our Longmont began with a keynote address by Dr. Anthony Ingraffea, the Baum Professor of Engineering at Cornell University and a highly regarded expert of the history of hydraulic fracturing and its present practices.  In 2011, TIME Magazine named him one of its “People Who Mattered.”  His widely published research on computer simulation and physical testing of complex fracturing processes provides the very latest information on the controversial process of fracking.

In a very engaging lecture with numerous slides, Dr. Ingraffea showed that the deleterious effects of the process of fracking are not in fact controversial.  Only someone ignorant of the widely published research could hold that view, and that includes data made public and researched by oil companies, themselves, as well as independent research scientists.  Among the more disturbing disclosures he offered was the very latest on fracturing technology’s saturation approach to drilling.  Gone are days of drilling single wells that are miles apart, or even drilling just a single well pad.  Dr. Ingraffea showed how the most economical and profitable drilling is now done on wells so closely spaced that the lateral drill shafts are only 500 feet apart.  Companies lease miles of land and then drill literally everywhere within it.  This means there would be explosions of shale every 500 feet.  It’s easy to see that no urban area could maintain its residences or general habitat if it was subjected to saturation drilling.  Why, then, are public officials in Colorado saying that only a few more regulations should make everything ok?  That is absurd.

Dr. Ingraffea also provided a perspective on the real economic data about fracking.  Far from being a great boon to the economy, most wells are played out within 5 years.  Most will also eventually leak, causing environmental damage, even if they are not actively drilled again.  Dr. Ingraffea showed that the Niobrara formation, which is underneath Longmont and most of the Front Range, is nowhere near the size of the Bakken Field in North Dakota.  It is only about one-tenth the size of the Bakken, possibly even less than that.  Why should we destroy the place where we live for this small amount of oil?   It will not significantly benefit the Longmont economy, but it will wreak havoc with our way of life and our health and safety.


You can also listen to an interview of Dr. Ingraffea on ClearingTheFogRadio.org.

Public Star Night at the Little Thompson Observatory

Friday, May 17th, 2013 — 7:00 – 11:00 PM

Little Thompson Observatory

Little Thompson Observatory

Public Star Night at the Little Thompson Observatory, 850 Spartan Ave at Berthoud High School (park east of the high school; directions are posted on our website, www.starkids.org).

Our guest speakers are William Murtagh and David Stone, from the Space Weather Prediction Center in Boulder, CO. The title of their talk will be: “Space Weather Storms: Are we ready for a ‘Space Katrina’”.

Our Nation is embarking on ambitious plans to modernize infrastructure which will be based on advanced technological resources vulnerable to space weather. Space weather impacts everyday life, including national security, emergency response, electric power grids, aviation, communications, global positioning system (GPS) applications, and satellite operations – technology we have come to rely on for our day-to-day activities. These recent advances in our technological infrastructure drive emerging space weather service needs undreamed of just a decade ago.

Extreme space weather

Extreme space weather

Extreme space weather storms are rare, but these low frequency events have significant consequences. Recent reports suggest the greatest natural disaster perhaps facing the Nation would be an intense geomagnetic storm. In December 2012, the U.S. National Intelligence Council presented solar geomagnetic storms as an event that could change the future course of human history. Building hazard-resilient communities is a national priority, but can we ensure the security of our high-tech community during an extreme space weather storm?

Bill Murtagh is the Program Coordinator for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Space Weather Prediction Center (SWPC) in Boulder, Colorado. He is NOAA’s space weather lead in coordinating preparedness and response efforts with industry, national and international agencies, emergency managers, and government officials around the world.

Bill is a member of the White House Working Group on geomagnetic disturbances, guiding national policy in response to space weather storms. He regularly briefs the White House and members of Congress and their staff on vulnerabilities of critical infrastructure. He is a regular guest speaker at universities, government agencies, and national and international conferences. Bill has provided numerous interviews to major media outlets and is featured in several TV documentaries on space weather, most recently on the Discovery Channel ‘Sun Storm’, and the NOVA show ‘Secrets of the Sun’.

Solar weather forecasting

Solar weather forecasting

Before joining NOAA, Bill was a meteorologist and space weather forecaster in the U.S. Air Force. He coordinated and provided meteorological support for national security interests around the world. Bill transferred to the SWPC in 1997 as a space weather forecaster and liaison between NOAA and the U.S. Air Force. He joined NOAA in 2003 after retiring from the Air Force with 23 years of military service.

David Stone is responsible for developing the software which currently ingests and processes the GOES-13/14/15 telemetry and creates the space weather instrument data plots and imagery that is used by Space Weather Forecasters.  Modeled after NASA/JPL’s Mars Rover ingest architecture, the success and complexity of this system earned him an Outstanding Performance Award from the University of Colorado.

As a PMP certified project manager, he now leads software development teams at SWPC developing critical forecaster tools and transitioning space weather models into operational weather products.  His latest team efforts focus on designing, implementing and re-hosting a new public Space Weather website for SWPC – targeting growth from the current 5 million visitors per day to over 50 million. He has a BS – Computer Science from USMA, West Point (1989) and a MS – Computer Science (in Artificial Intelligence) from Stanford (1996).

The doors will open at 7:00pm and the presentation will start at 7:30pm.  Weather permitting after the presentation (around 8:30 PM), visitors will be invited to observe various celestial objects through our 6” Astro-Physics Refractor, and 18” Tinsley and 24” Cole Reflector telescopes.

Public star nights at LTO are held the third Friday of each month (except July, when we are closed for annual maintenance). No reservations are necessary for these nights. Just come and join us for the talk and some observing afterwards.

If you have any questions, please call the observatory information line at 970-613-7793 or check the LTO web site at: www.starkids.org

Public Star Nights at the Pioneer Museum, 224 Mountain Avenue in Berthoud, home of the historical 6” Brashear Refractor from John Bunyan, are held on the first Friday of each month. If you have any questions, please call the Bunyan observatory information line at 970-532-2147 or check the museum web site at: http://www.berthoudhistoricalsociety.org/bunyan.htm

 

Sincerely,

Meinte Veldhuis, President, Little Thompson Science Foundation

“Be FrackSURE” Conference Announced by Our Longmont

Be FrackSURE logo -fracksure-sm

 

Longmont, CO…Our Health, Our Future, Our Longmont, the organization that sponsored the city charter amendment that banned hydraulic fracturing (fracking) in Longmont, will hold an educational conference on fracking (hydraulic fracturing) and its many perils.

“Be FrackSURE:  What you don’t know may WELL hurt you,” will be held on April 27, 2013, from 9 AM to 5 PM at the Plaza Conference Center (1850 Industrial Circle, Longmont) behind the Best Western Plus Plaza Hotel.  Tickets for the event are $38 to cover the costs of the event.  Pre-registration is necessary and tickets can be purchased at www.fracksure.org.

Dr. Anthony IngraffeaOur Longmont is thrilled to have Dr. Anthony Ingraffea as the Keynote Speaker at “Be FrackSURE.”  Dr. Ingraffea is the foremost engineering authority on fracture mechanics and holds the prestigious title of Dwight C. Baum Professor of Engineering in Cornell University’s Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering.   “With his partners in what has become known as the Cornell Study, Dr. Ingraffea revealed that, contrary to the never-ending mythology promulgated by the oil and gas industry, unconventional gas, procured by fracking likely emits more greenhouse gas pollution into the atmosphere during its life cycle than does coal,” said Our Longmont’s Kaye Fissinger.

In 2011, TIME Magazine named him one of its “People Who Mattered.”  Not only is Dr. Ingraffea among the “people who matter,” but he also recognizes that people matter in this battle with the oil and gas industry, politicians who embrace it, and regulators too closely tied to it.  When asked his position on the impacts of drilling for oil and gas using horizontal fracking, Dr. Ingraffea, with his vast knowledge in this area, unequivocally states, “Where shale gas development has not yet occurred, ban it.  Period. Where it is occurring, enact ironclad regulations, inspect for compliance with them with dogged diligence, and enforce them relentlessly with fines that really mean something.”

Dr. Geoffrey Thyne will be the featured speaker during the “Be FrackSURE” buffet luncheon.  Dr. Thyne, author or co-author of over 50 peer-reviewed scientific papers, will speak to the complexities of research and the influence of industry and government in academic settings.

Breakout sessions on the health ramifications of fracking on air and water and on the economic ramifications of fracking will include notable experts Phillip Doe, Wes Wilson, Shane Davis, Pete Morton and Jeanne Bassett.  Sam Schabacker, Mountain West Region Director for Food & Water Watch, will discuss ways for others to protect their communities from the dangers of fracking in urban areas where people live, work and play.

Said Michael Bellmont, spokesperson for Our Longmont, “No day would be complete without music and Our Longmont is proud to be able to present the acclaimed Hazel Miller, who has been called a ‘force of nature’ herself.  With her ‘stunning, moving, and powerful’ voice, Hazel has been a sought after performer in Colorado for the past 24 years. Whether she is singing blues, jazz, pop, or Gospel, her voice charges the songs with a primal dose of genuine soul.”

Our Longmont’s “Be FrackSURE” is proud to have Patagonia as its corporate sponsor.  Patagonia, a designer of outdoor clothing and gear, explains its sponsorship of Our Longmont’s “Be Frack SURE” conference, “We give at the grassroots level to innovative groups mobilizing their communities to take action.  This is our niche: supporting people working on the frontlines of the environmental crisis.”

Our Longmont encourages everyone who is concerned about fracking and who wants to be more fully informed by experts in their fields to join with them for this interactive, informative, day-long event.  Come celebrate the progress that has been made in Colorado to restrain and prohibit the dangerous practice of fracking, and to energize our continuing efforts to keep up the fight for our health, safety, property values and quality of life in Longmont, along the Front Range and throughout all of Colorado.

Detailed information can be found at www.ourlongmont.org/be-frac-sure/.

Lafayette Community Forum on Hydraulic Fracturing

Forum: The Hidden Risks of Fracking
When: Sunday, March 24th 2:00 – 5:00
Where: Angevine Middle School, 1150 S. Boulder Rd., Lafayette

Please join East Boulder County United on Sunday, March 24th for our forum on hydraulic fracturing. Lafayette sits on the Wattenberg Shale and is in line to see major drilling operations in the period of time to come. We boarder Erie, which now has over 150 wells and is seeing levels of propane in their air several times higher than those of Houston, Texas and ten times that of Pasadena California, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Hydraulic fracturing, unchecked, will alter the daily life of our community in every possible sense.

Join us in hearing from the affected neighbors, expert Shane Davis on the full dangers of hydraulic fracturing, and Our Longmont organizers that successfully banned the process from their community in November of 2012.

Contact
Cliff Willmeng, Steering Committee, EBCU; 303-478-6613
Rachael Zatterstrom, Steering Committee, EBCU; 970-409-9820
Cliff Smedley, Steering Committee, EBCU; 303-808-0117