Photos

Surprise! Ken Buck Shows Up for Work!

Longmont Area Democrats had their “with or without Ken Buck town hall meeting” and guess who showed up? The man himself. Think activism doesn’t have any effect – there it is. Buck started out on the defensive and got more shrill as the meeting wore on. He hacked his way through a series of questions, tossing out rhetoric, GOP talking points and some good ole fashioned bullshit – which the crowd called him out on. It got tense a few times and I think the organizers wished they had a whip and chair – but the Dems calmed down and Ken didn’t run away (as GOP candidates are wont to do when faced with any substantive resistance). It was a great meeting – the Dems were fired up and Buck scurried away with his pants still smoking, staff hustling to keep up. Thanks to Shari Malloy who asked me to shoot this meeting – and a special thanks to everyone that came and spoke!

Photos at Flickr.

My friend Kate Beier asking Ken Buck a question:

Jones, Singer and Foote Townhall Longmont Jan. 30, 2014

Rep. Jon Singer, Mike Foote and Matt Jones

Rep. Jon Singer, Mike Foote and Matt Jones

Three Democratic legislators held a townhall in Longmont at Front Range Community College on January 30, 2014. Residents turned out to ask questions about higher education support, family issues and the ALEC-controlled Highway 36 contract. Lots of great discussion. Mike Foote, John Singer and Matt Jones took turns responding to questions and discussing legislative issues.

Rep. Singer at one point referenced his well-worn shoes, reflecting on how the wear reminded him of his constituents and what they’re dealing with daily. Jon’s been a great rep so far – he’s the soul of civility and compassion.

Two darker moments: a gentleman politely but very determinedly brought up the issue of a meth house that’s wrecking their neighborhood, despite constant complaints and police action. It’s a mess and I encourage the city to move quickly.

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“You’re all liars”

The second downbeat note was a gentleman of some distinction making the clear and unequivocal observation that all three of our representatives were ‘liars’ and had ‘violated their oaths’ – needless to say you could practically hear the audience bristle. I’m pleased to say no one interrupted him or shouted him down. Our representatives politely responded, rebutted all of his points and gave him his hearing. He left immediately afterward and was unavailable for comment.

Don Haddad of St. Vrain Schools spoke briefly from his seat in the crowd and had good points about funding and how it directly affects the classroom.

Laverne Johnson, Mayor of Lyons was also in the crowd and had a few comments. She was greeted warmly by the audience.

FRCC President Andrew R. Dorsey

FRCC President Andrew R. Dorsey

Front Range Community College President Andrew Dorsey also spoke a number of times and underlined in concrete terms how his work on shared credit had benefitted the entire Community College system. He also mentioned FRCC’s new machining program. Mr. Dorsey’s a great speaker and a steady hand for the college. I admired how he took the questions about his position and responded eloquently and politely.

DSC_0052-delgatoMembers of the student governance group were also present and spoke briefly but engagingly. I invite the students to submit articles and links to their blogs. FRL welcomes FRCC students!

I’m glad I had the time to attend, a well-done event and great chance to talk to your reps, FRCC’s student organization did the community a great service. Thanks folks!!

Here’s the photoset at Flickr.

Adult Education Graduation – June 20, 2013

DSC_0134-ThrillOfGraduationThe Adult Education progam of St. Vrain Valley schools had their final graduation ceremony on Thursday June 20, 2013. I believe there were 100 graduates, all obviously thrilled to have their prized diplomas in hand. I heard stories about overcoming adversity to get an education, mothers working and going to school and the powerful support of friends and family. These are people working hard to achieve the American Dream, they embody the basic principles that America was founded on. And they make me very proud. Thank you to the staff for all their work and thanks for inviting me to attend! I hope you like the photos, glad I could be on hand!

Here’s the entire photoset – you can also go directly to the Flickr set by clicking here.

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Here’s two of the speeches I heard:

J. Ruben Saenz

J. Ruben Saenz, 2013

J. Ruben Saenz, 2013

I am a Mexican by birth and an American by naturalization. I am originally from Ojinaja Chihuahua Mexico, a small town on the border with Texas, in 1979 I waved goodbye to my country and moved to New Orleans, which is a multicultural city, it was there, that for the first time in my life I was exposed to a wide variety of languages and dialects, that awakened in me a passion for languages and gave me an idea where to direct my steps to.

I came to this school with two purposes: a) when I left my country, even though I had already some academic achievements, I did not bring with me any transcripts to accredit my education, I decided therefore, to get a high school diploma from an accredited American institution. b) Having obtained a High School Diploma entailed also a personal challenge, the intellectual exorcism of certain fears, concerns I had regarding subjects I struggle with when I was young, math to be specific. Those fears have been conquered, it was a challenge that in the end was well worth it, in fact this second time around, it was actually fun.

To retiterate what I mentioned earlier, getting a High School Diploma was most of all a personal challenge, which I was able to accomplish the only way success is achieved in this life, through hard work and effort.. By the way, my appreciation and respect for all the ladies who are graduating tonite, what you’ve accomplished is commendable. It’s all the same, through hard work and effort were you able to juggle school and a job, while at the same time taking care of your families. It goes to prove that you ladies can accomplish anything if you wish: the sky is the limit, and may this High School Diploma be just the beginning of a series of academic achievements.

As for me, I plan to pursue my goal, which is to grow in the exciting field of translation and interpretation, which by the way I also became certified on just two days ago from the Community College of Aurora. It’s a very demanding and challenging career, but at the end of the day, I thrive on challenges.

For us Latinos, the family plays a crucial role in our daily lives; I dare to say that just as it was for me, for many of the Latinos gathered here tonight, we are what we are, thanks to the unwavering support of our respective families. We Latinos, regardless of our ages and whereabouts, in a way, we actually never left home. Even though we did, we’ll always carry wherever we go a piece of it.

And last but not least, I would like to thank on my behalf and that of my fellow students, The Board of Education for this unique academic opportunity offered to us, thanks also to all the teachers, Mrs. Hena, Marcia, Betsy, Rebecca, Susannah. Thanks to all the substitute teachers and volunteers for donating your time and effort. I apologize if I omitted anyone.

In closing, I would like to make a small personal comment regarding the closure of this school, it’s a shame that other adults, minorities as well as young people, won’t be able to benefit from a quality education. This just gives us a glimpse of where the priorities of our leaders are.

On this note congratulations to teachers and students for a job well done and good luck to all in the future.


Douglas Joel Guzman Cerna

Douglas Joel Guzman Cerna - 2013

Douglas Joel Guzman Cerna – 2013

First of all I would like to thank the creator of life, honored guests, fellow graduates, staff and friends. My name is Douglas Joel Guzman Cerna. I’m from Nicaragua and I’m 36 years old. I came to the U.S. when I was 15 years old. I went to school in North Carolina for about three years. Then, I quit school and I started working. I started meeting many people who encouraged me to stay in school but I never listened to them. I would like to thank all those people that have been in my life in so many different ways. Also I would like to thank the negative people too, because they encouraged me to prove them wrong.

I came to Adult Education with the hunger to learn more and to earn a high school diploma, what the inside of me had always wanted. I came to that point and made that decision, and now I did it, with my efforts and the good teachers I had.

My family has been all the people that I have met in my journey of this life. I have been learning from them, from the way they live their lives and the way they treat me. It has been awesome. Even the negative people have helped me because I done what they didn’t expect me to do.

My plans are that one day I will be an architect because I have been learning a lot about construction. As you know when you have the desire to do what you want, you do it; there’s nothing easy but you can do it. Nobody will do it for you. I hope one day that I will reach my goal to be an architect just like I have reached this goal of my high school diploma.

I would like to thank the District Board of Education and the St. Vrain Valley School District for providing the opportunity to earn my high school diploma. Thanks to all and God bless all of us.

 

Berthoud Day Parade 2013 Photos

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My wife Tammi was part of the team that manned the Happy Tails Dog Ranch and Sun Pony Ranch float in the Berthoud Day Parade on Saturday June 1, 2013. I don’t have details on all the floats so this is just my photos of them as I walked the parade staging area after photographing the Happy Tails Dog Ranch crew. LOTS of great entries! Not the least of these were the equestrians – LOTS of impressive horses, rigs and riders. The Back Country Horseback folks were particularly well-done I felt.

It was fun to see all the agricultural tools – turned out in high style, looking like new in most cases and amusingly aged when not. I refer to the Jeep tow truck. What a fun vehicle!

Anyway, there’s over a hundred images – they’re hosted at Flickr so you can go there and download the 6Mpx images. (Best my little D40 will do.) If you’d like to use any or all of these images, I’d appreciate a credit of “Photo by FreeRangeLongmont” but it’s not mandatory. Please feel free to use without attribution.

Berthoud’s a great town and has a ton of spirit, I hope folks enjoy these images as much as I did taking them. Berthoud Days will be on my schedule next year for sure.

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The Worth of Water

We never know the worth of water till the well is dry. ~Thomas Fuller, Gnomologia, 1732

On Sunday Jan. 9 the Longmont Republican Women held an event called “New Year New GOP” at the Well and indicated it was ‘Open to the Public.’ Well, I could hardly turn that down!

Here’s the photos I took:

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There was a lovely spaghetti & meatball dinner provided by Mark Price of Aunt Alice’s Kitchen. I love Aunt Alice’s so I know it was great food. There was also a very tasty looking dessert from the folks at the Well. I didn’t partake, just didn’t feel right mooching a meal, being a lefty and all. Besides, there was a respectable crowd (in all senses of the word of course!) gathered in the Well’s cavernous industrial space and they were hungry – not just for food either.

Joel Champion announced the formation of the Private Property Council, a non-partisan group with open membership. The mission is education and the setting up of teams ‘to do monitoring of our public officials who are elected and help move our ideas forward in legislation at all levels of the city, county and state.’

At one point Joel mentioned ‘our Democratic friends in the audience’ which prompted Peg Cage to ask him to introduce Kaye Fissinger and myself. Thank you Joel! Thank you Peg! We appreciated being allowed to attend.

Here’s all the rest of the details of those speaking.

Derrick Wilburn, Founder, Rocky Mountain Black Conservatives gave a well-polished and aggressive lecture about what the GOP needed to do to get the votes of conservatives of color. Solomon Martinez gave a report about the Northern Colorado Hispanic Relations group as well as his views on outreach. The featured speaker, Tom Tancredo – confessed to suffering from ‘Post Election Stress Syndrome’ and said it had been ‘debilitating.’ CO GOP Chair Ryan Call laid out the wreckage of the campaign like an FAA crash inspector. It was some hard talk.

I left before the question and answer period but I’d be delighted to link to any audio files from that.

New Year New GOP speaker audio files

Brought to you by: Longmont Republican Women, The Well Outreach and Worship Center, The Longmont 9-12 Tea Party

Mr. Frackenlooper’s Town Meeting

Father and daughter have a special view of the governor.

Big John Hickenlooper apparently only hangs out with the ‘real’ people, not those pesky ‘constituents. It tickled my heart to see all these folks come to say quite clearly that they wouldn’t stand quietly by as their lives and homes were bargained for.

Here’s the Flickr gallery of photos.

From Silver Creek Leadership Academy students:


A few educational notes about public photography

The following is from Petapixel and is the text of a reference on photographers rights. If you’d like to submit a photo to Free Range Longmont, please be sure these rules have been observed:

  1. You can make a photograph of anything and anyone on any public property, except where a specific law prohibits it. i.e. streets, sidewalks, town squares, parks, government buildings open to the public, and public libraries.
  2. You may shoot on private property if it is open to the public, but you are obligated to stop if the owner requests it. i.e. malls, retail stores, restaurants, banks, and office building lobbies.
  3. Private property owners can prevent photography ON their property, but not photography OF their property from a public location.
  4. Anyone can be photographed without consent when they are in a public place unless there is a reasonable expectation of privacy. i.e. private homes, restrooms, dressing rooms, medical facilities, and phone booths.
  5. Despite common misconceptions, the following subjects are almost always permissible:
    • accidents, fire scenes, criminal activities
    • children, celebrities, law enforcement officers
    • bridges, infrastructure, transportation facilities
    • residential, commercial, and industrial buildings
  6. Security is rarely an acceptable reason for restricting photography. Photographing from a public place cannot infringe on trade secrets, nor is it terrorist activity.
  7. Private parties cannot detain you against your will unless a serious crime was committed in their presence. Those that do so may be subject to criminal and civil charges.
  8. It is a crime for someone to threaten injury, detention, confiscation, or arrest because you are making photographs.
  9. You are not obligated to provide your identity or reason for photographing unless questioned by a law enforcement officer and state law requires it.
  10. Private parties have no right to confiscate your equipment without a court order. Even law enforcement officers must obtain one unless making an arrest. No one can force you to delete photos you have made.

These are general guidelines regarding the right to make photos and should not be interpreted as legal advice. If you need legal help, please contact a lawyer.


Here’s a few more good references on photographer’s rights:

The Photographer’s Right by Bert P. Krages II, attorney at law. PDF Pocket Ref.

Photography & the First Amendment

Know Your Rights: Photographers

Candidates Forum 8-15-12

The Boulder County Candidates Forum – held by PFLAG (Parents, Families and Friends of Lesbians and Gays of Boulder County, Colorado) at First United Methodist Church in Boulder, CO.

These photos are free to use if attributed “Photo by FreeRangeLongmont.com”

Little Thompson Observatory welcomes 50,000th visitor

The 18-inch Tinsley Classical Cassegrain

On Wednesday 25 January 2012 at 7:00pm the Little Thompson Observatory (LTO) in Berthoud welcomed its 50,000th visitor since opening its doors in June 1999.

The LTO is a non-profit all-volunteer observatory that is open to the general public any night of the year by appointment and on every third Friday of each month for a Public Star Night. For more information, please go to the website www.starkids.org.

The group attending the celebration was Scout Troop 787 under the leadership of Jared Meier from Loveland, with about 15 scouts and 3 or 4 parents/leaders.

The LTO awarded the scout troop a plaque commemorating this event.

 

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Editor’s note: I volunteered to rebuild the Little Thompson Observatory website in 2008. The more I worked with the group of volunteers that had built and now run the observatory the more impressed I became. I had just gotten the site fully operational and handed off when my wife Marilyn was diagnosed with cancer. The team picked up the slack and ran the site with no assist whatsoever for several months until I was able to return to duty as volunteer webmaster.

I’m deeply honored to be part of the team that operates this observatory. If you ever want to see your tax dollars at work and rugged individualists doing good work with their own time and money, come visit the LTO. The telescopes are provided by the Telescopes in Education program and the control software is donated by Software Bisque. Everything else is community donations and volunteer manpower. This facility is a real gem. —MDW

Longmont City Council 12-20-2011

Huge turnout of citizens opposed to fracking – all asking Council to impose a six-month ban on new applications and licenses to drill until careful study is done and regulations reviewed to ensure the public’s interest is protected.

Several oil-industry folks showed up and are noted.

Council voted for a 120 day moratorium by a 7 – 0 vote.

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TO :  CITY OF LONGMONT  c/o Brien Schumacher

FROM:  CITIZENS OF UNION RESERVOIR

RE: CONCERNS OF OIL AND GAS DEVELOPMENT AROUND UNION RESERVOIR

DATE: DECEMBER 12, 2011

Attached:

Full COGCC report of Complaint #1433445 and  Remediation # 3743 regarding contamination at Rider Well #1 next to Trail Ridge Middle School(31 pages-2 sided)

CTL Thompson Report May 22, 2006(17 pages 2 sided)

Cordilleran Report August 14, 2008 (33 pages-2 sided)

Cordilleran Report December 12, 2008 (36 pages-2 sided)

Olsson Associates Report July 10, 2009 (19 pages-1 sided)

Maps of COGCC Field Inspector, Environment, Engineering, Location Assessment, Permitting Coverage(5 page)

OSHA Oil and Gas Well Drilling and Servicing(11 Pages)

INTRODUCTION

The Oil and Gas Conservation Act does not totally preempt a home-rule city’s exercise of land-use authority over Oil and Gas Development and Operations within the territorial limits of the city. We believe there is a human element, as well as a cumulative effect, of the Oil & Gas Drilling and Hydraulic Fracturing industry that affects citizens and is not currently addressed by the State of Colorado and COGCC.  At this point, it is widely accepted that most damage and contamination occurs near the surface.  Due to it’s lack of accountability, there is no other industry allowed to severely risk property values, public health, environment, and local jobs, to the extent the Oil and Gas Drilling and Hydraulic Fracturing process does, and therefore this needs to be addressed.

PROPERTY VALUES

We believe the property values of residents and City of Longmont will decline where there is a concentration of industrial activity from Oil & Gas Drilling and Hydraulic Fracturing, consistent with those seen across the state and country.  We believe the area around Union Reservoir will be a ‘heavily fracked’ area over the next decade if this industrial activity is allowed in City of Longmont jurisdiction.  Screening and aesthetic change must be considered  to protect property values, with regard to consolidation of wells near schools,  residential zoning, and inside recreation areas.  Who incurs the costs?  Will the City experience a direct loss of revenue from fees for recreation and events at Union Reservoir, in relation to Oil & Gas Drilling and Hydraulic Fracturing? What is the projected total of wells to be considered around Union Reservoir over the next decade or two. “In recent years, landowners in heavily ‘fracked’ parts of the county, like Garfield County Colorado, have seen property values plummet. Retirees, like Dee Hoffmeister and Lisa Bracken, have experienced this first hand. Both of their families have found themselves powerless to pursue any recourse at recovering the damage done to their personal assets.” NYT 11/19/11.

TRANSPORTATION

We believe the current proposed accessibility for the Eckel, Steinke, or Bogott property will need improvements and therefore are subject to  investigation and compensation. There will need to be upgrades to existing transportation on WCR 1 infrastructure to accommodate heavy truck traffic. We need a comprehensive study of these impacts on the roads over time, given that if the industry is allowed in City limits, there will be more wells drilled and fracked than the current proposal, in this area.  Also, we do not believe the State of Colorado or COGCC address hazardous commercial vehicle access and proximity to residential housing, schools, and recreation areas. What happens if one of these trucks accidentally hits an occupied residence in transit, given the proximity to dwellings on the current proposal? Are these people evacuated prior to transport?  Do we know what hazardous chemicals will be transported in City limits?

INSURANCE and INDEMNITY

Potential damage costs associated with a hazardous spills needs to be assessed. We believe there should be a requirement for insurance above and beyond what is currently required by the State of Colorado or the COGCC, especially if the applicant has a past history of several violations. The City of Longmont must demand a Indemnity Bond to guarantee sufficient indemnification for all loss that could be sustained as a result of reduced value or damage to property and environment.  We believe that the applicant should be required to carry a cash Reclamation Bond, that would guarantee the eventual clean-up of any and all damage caused by Oil and Gas Drilling and Hydraulic Fracturing, returning the site to its natural, pre-development condition, particularly if the applicant has a history of contaminations and violations. Will there be Development Bonds regarding public infrastructure improvements necessitated by the Drilling, Hydraulic Fracturing, Hauling, and related Construction activities?

DISCLOSURE

Current Federal, State, and COGCC regulations do not allow for full disclosure of chemicals and concentrations used in the Oil & Gas Drilling and Hydraulic Fracturing process. We believe this puts all life at risk if an accident were to occur and treatment were necessary for contamination.  Are contaminations, such as COGCC Complaint #1433445/Remediation #3743, reported to the city, school, or adjacent properties?  We believe that all records pertaining to all wells shall always be kept available for public record, due to the longevity of the wells.

EMERGENCY RESPONSE

There will need to be education and training with regard to local authorities knowledge of contamination procedures concerning toxic chemicals used.  Who is responsible for these costs? Particular attention should be given, due to the proximity to schools, dwellings, and location on City of Longmont public recreation areas with proposed trails. All locations on the current proposal will combine for higher concentration of pedestrian traffic adjacent to the industrial activity, as compared to rural, private property. Reverse 911 for chemical spills?

Do we know what hazardous chemicals will be allowed in City limits?

SETBACKS

Current setback mandates by The State of Colorado and COGCC are not sufficient to protect surface property owners or occupants from Oil and Gas Drilling and Hydraulic Fracturing.  Current regulation, allowing concentration of industrial activity, with regard to consolidated well pads, and the proximity to dwellings, schools, water source, and recreation areas, puts human life at risk.  See attached submittal from the United States Department of Labor, OSHA guidelines, regarding potential hazards involved with Oil and Gas Drilling and Hydraulic Fracturing.  If there were an accident during any part of the process, are the setbacks sufficient to protect children playing 50’ away on adjacent properties? Clearly, this is an industrial activity, concentrated, with regard to consolidation of wells.  There needs to be much larger setbacks from adjacent properties and dwellings when proposed next to residential areas, schools, water source, and recreation areas. The City of Longmont needs to study, ‘What is the safe distance?’, regarding this industry and it’s concentration effects with regard to well consolidation.

AIR, SOIL, WATER, MONITORING

We believe this industry to have many potential health side effects related to air, soil, and water contamination.  We do not believe that current Federal , State of Colorado, or COGCC  regulations adequately cover the air, soil,  and water pollution, with regard to Oil and Gas Drilling and Hydraulic Fracturing.  We are concerned that we, as citizens adjacent to this concentrated industrial activity,  will bear the costs of the oversight shortcomings with our health.  We also believe current contamination level acceptability for several hazardous chemicals(See Table 910-1 of COGCC rules),  with regard to air, soil, and water pollution, by Federal, State of Colorado, and COGCC are insufficient, as it relates to the Oil and Gas Drilling and Hydraulic Fracturing industry.   Especially in close proximity to schools, residences, and public recreation areas.  Clear and accurate information on accessibility to  air, soil, and water tests must be provided to adjacent property owners and schools, with sufficient time, to accumulate a baseline inventory of air, soil, and water composition, prior to any commencement of drilling, if they choose to have independent testing done.   We need a soil, air, and water baseline inventory to assess long term changes in the soil , water, and air around proposed well sites by the applicant or City of Longmont.  We would like multiple samples of air taken at all places of interest and in the breathing zone of the exposed population.  Emission monitoring for VOC’s, road dust, and ozone flare are necessary throughout the process of Oil and Gas Drilling and Hydraulic Fracturing process.  There is limited toxicological data and an unavailability of accepted inhalation toxicity values for 65 out of 86 detected contaminants in the air.  Must we get sick to prove toxicity?  We believe this project should be funded with profits, projected or realized, relating to Oil and Gas exploration.   The City of Longmont should mandate closed loop systems.  The City of Longmont should require the usage of nontoxic, green chemicals for the Stimulation process.  An increase of engineered monitoring wells for those applicants that have a history of contamination and poor remediation are necessary.  Storm water runoff rules, given the proximities to watersheds, are necessary.  We believe it is clear, there is not enough emphasis by the Federal Government, the State of Colorado and COGCC regarding these issues. Evidence of this is can be seen by  attached COGCC Complaint #1433445 and Remediation #3743. We believe it is incumbent upon the City of Longmont or other profiteer of Oil and Gas exploration on City of Longmont property, to fund a local, independent scientific study, regarding information we can gain about side effects from this industry , given the large sums of profits.

LIGHT AND NOISE MONITORING

We do not believe the current State of Colorado, COGCC, or local laws adequately cover  light or noise pollution created during Oil and Gas Drilling and Hydraulic Fracturing near residential areas, schools, or recreation areas.

OVERSIGHT

It is clear, based on the amount of wells in this region, current and projected, and number of COGCC inspectors, engineers, permitters, and environmental managers, per region, that there is not enough oversight.  It is clear, upon review of attached Complaint #1433445/Remediation # 3743, that there is a lack of follow up and implementation of remediation by the COGCC when contamination occurs.   Current COGCC inspections only occur, on average, once every 3 years. This is unacceptable, particularly in residential, school, and public access recreation areas, where there is a higher concentration of human population, or next to a water source.  Even when the contamination is above legal limits and remediation is demanded, records reveal a clear lack of attention and enforcement by COGCC. Evidence seen by Remediation #3743  puts school children, water table, and property values at risk. Will the city be obligated to incur the expense of hiring additional staff to regularly inspect the oil well activities and sites?  Who will be inspecting? How often? How can we demand faster remediation if there is an accident?  If the offending activity is not witnessed while it’s occurring, then no penalties can be imposed.

TRACING

We believe there should be a benign element introduced to the chemicals used during the Oil & Gas Drilling and Hydraulic fracturing process to identify the proprietor, if there were a contamination to occur. This element is particularly important to consider when the applicant has a history of violation.

BAD ACTOR

We do not believe that there should be any approval of  a proposal where the applicant has shown negligence in remediation. 906.a and 906.d of COGCC rules.  We do not believe that there should be any approval of  a proposal where the applicant has had previous contamination within the City of Longmont. The applicant should be reputable in all areas of public activity, including credit ratings, harassment violations, workman’s compensation cases, construction health and safety compliance, regulatory requirements, and any legal issues. This is an industrial activity that puts Citizens lives in danger when shortcuts occur.

ZONING

We believe current zoning to be inconsistent with the proposed consolidated pad on Parcel 120536400011 and surroundings.  There needs to be a higher standard with respect to location  of consolidated drill pads and their effect on overall surroundings.   We believe there will be a drop in property values for those existing homes adjacent to where PUD-R zoning would need to be changed to accommodate Oil and Gas Drilling and Hydraulic fracturing at this site.

QUALITY OF LIFE

We believe any acceptance of Oil and Gas Drilling and Hydraulic Fracturing around Union Reservoir is a compromise of the citizens quality of life.  One of the benchmark standards for quality of life, nationally, regionally, and locally, is the accessibility to open space and recreation areas.  Approval of any industrial activity in these designated areas, restricts that access, therefore, compromises quality of life.  Current State of Colorado and COGCC regulations do not account for this, but we believe local authority should.

CHILD HEALTH CONSIDERATIONS

Given the proposed proximity to residence, schools, and public trails, with regard to consolidation of industrial activity, the many physical differences between children and adults demand special emphasis. A child’s lower body weight and higher intake rate results in a greater dose of hazardous substance per unit of body weight. They could be at greater risk than adults from certain kinds of exposure to hazardous substances. Children play outdoors and sometimes engage in hand-to-mouth behaviors that increase their exposure potential. Children are shorter than are adults; this means they breathe dust, soil, and vapors close to the ground. If toxic exposure levels are high enough during critical growth stages, the developing body systems of children can sustain permanent damage. Finally, children are dependent on adults for access to housing, for access to medical care, and for risk identification. Thus, adults need as much information as possible to make informed decisions regarding their children’s health.

MACROECOLOGY

All living things fail without water.  Under current Federal, State of Colorado, and COGCC laws and guidelines, the hydraulic fracturing industry fails to address long term consequences of enormous amounts of water contamination.  We are contaminating one finite resource we cannot substitute, in water, for another resource, in gas, we can substitute.  This industry should not be allowed to continue without research into how to successfully decontaminate water, with regard to chemicals used in the Oil & Gas Hydraulic Fracturing process, or demand usage of green chemicals.  The City of Longmont should mandate green completions.

CONCLUSION

This letter does not preclude our neighborhood from submitting further issues, given the fast rate at which the City of Longmont is choosing to proceed with its analysis and judgment of the Oil & Gas Drilling and Hydraulic Fracturing process allowed in city limits. We believe current Federal, State of Colorado, local and COGCC rules and laws do not protect its Citizens, with regard to Oil and Gas drilling and Hydraulic Fracturing.  We believe the City of Longmont should immediately suspend the acceptance of applications for permits for oil and gas development for 6 months, so that the aforementioned issues can be fully vetted and that municipal codes can be adopted to resolve the issues. We believe the City of Longmont should suspend all Oil & Gas Drilling and Hydraulic Fracturing development within our community for 6 months.  We believe the City of Longmont should immediately create and pass a Municipal Ordinance that establishes the inalienable right of the City of Longmont citizens and electorate to control, ban, and outlaw Oil and Gas well activities within our Municipality.  Cost of doing business should not severely risk property values, public health, environment, and local jobs.  We urge the City of Longmont to protect our Civil Rights.

Attached:

Full COGCC report of Complaint #1433445 and  Remediation # 3743 regarding contamination at Rider Well #1 next to Trail Ridge Middle School(31 pages-2 sided)

CTL Thompson Report May 22, 2006(17 pages 2 sided)

Cordilleran Report August 14, 2008 (33 pages-2 sided)

Cordilleran Report December 12, 2008 (36 pages-2 sided)

Olsson Associates Report July 10, 2009 (19 pages-1 sided)

Maps of COGCC Field Inspector, Environment, Engineering, Location Assessment, Permitting Coverage(5 page)

OSHA Oil and Gas Well Drilling and Servicing(11 Pages)

Submitted 12/12/11

Citizens of Union Reservoir

Pat Eckel

Joe Kelliher

Dave Miller

Linda Miller

Chris Porzuczek

Sheila Porzuczek

Diane Seaman

Tom Seaman

Dick VanProosdy

Joyce VanProosdy

Charles Walck

Carol Walck

Van Dusen Campaign Kick Off

Bill Van Dusen

Bill Van Dusen

Bill Van Dusen officially kicked off his campaign for Boulder County Commissioner tonight at the Dickens Tavern. Here’s Mr. Van Dusen’s announcement.

A little while back, I announced my decision to run for Boulder County Commissioner, for the seat being vacated by Commissioner Ben Pearlman. I am running for my daughter and I want my daughter to continue to grow up in this amazing place where she has all the opportunities to grow and thrive. For me, that is a county that continues to place great value on its open spaces and public lands; it is a county that strives to provide exceptional services and resources to its residents; and it is a county that partners with businesses to bring job opportunities and meet the challenges of the current economy.

I look forward to hearing from you and sharing my vision for Boulder County.

Your support means so much.

Thank You,

Bill Van Dusen

Here’s some photos from the event:

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The Dickens is such a lovely place. Here’s a multi-frame panorama of the event:

Swearing

Longmont City Council - Nov 7, 2011

Dennis L. Coombs, Longmont's 43rd Mayor

Longmont political royalty was on hand tonight for the City Council swearing-in. No less than Julia Pirnack and Leona Stoecker were in the audience at the swearing-in of Longmont’s 43rd Mayor, Dennis L. Coombs. Other notables included Tom McCoy and Roger Lange. It was a distinct pleasure to see Roger Lange, one of the most even-handed mayors Longmont’s ever had. His comment was “You’re going to really enjoy working with Dennis.”

Thank you Roger, I’m sure we all will.

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Occupy Longmont – Nov 5, 2011

The Occupy Longmont protesters took to the streets again this Saturday.

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The organization will be having a weekly protest every Saturday at 1:30 at Longs Peak and Main St. – come on down and bring your friends! We want to grow this event every week.