Tag Archive for corporations

Proud ‘nanny-stater’

Signing the Declaration of Independence

Government, of by and for the people.

A Nov. 17 letter in the Times-Call, “Small government, free market a radical idea,” prompted me to throw my hat into the ring of ideas. When the Founding Fathers are invoked as some sort of demigods, I like to remind the public that in fact they were really a bunch of privileged white men who helped put together a two-tiered system that perpetuated the continued advantage of their class. Women, Native Americans, slaves, indentured servants and those who owned no land were not part of the design.

But they were not all bad and had some great vision. For one thing, they were anti “free market,” if free market is defined as allowing corporations to wield as much power as they do today. The revolution was as much against huge corporations like the East India Company, whose tea was dumped into the bay, as it was against the King of England. The modern “tea party” derives from a revolt against corporate power, even though this subtlety seems to escape many who consider themselves “tea partiers.” In revolutionary times corporations were chartered by states, which could “pull the charters” if corporations got too powerful. They were tightly regulated and political contribution by corporations was a criminal offense. Corporations gained the ludicrous distinction of “personhood” nearly a century later.

The mention of “nanny state” in this letter makes me chuckle! This phrase must have been hatched by some “Fox News derisive moniker wizard.” Well, I’m all for a nanny state. Government, of by and for the people. A single-payer health system. Unions that provide a countervailing force against corporate looting of the middle class and the Earth. I guess I’m a proud “nanny-stater” and proud to endorse the Occupy Wall Street movement. Hopefully we will wake up before our children inherit a feudal state.

Stopping solar in the South

From the Inter Press Service News Agency

Big Energy Firms Blocking Solar Power in South

By Matthew Cardinale

ATLANTA, Georgia, Mar 31, 2010 (IPS) – As citizens, businesses and non-profit organisations seek to transition to cleaner power sources like solar and wind, some big energy firms whose business models rely on polluting sources are standing in the way.

In Georgia, the energy company Georgia Power has lobbied for favourable public policies at the Public Service Commission (PSC) and State legislature that are making it difficult for the state’s residents to transition to solar power.

IPS learned that the Dekalb County school system wanted to put solar panels on their schools, but could not do it because of state policies like the Territorial Electric Service Act of 1973 which gives Georgia Power a monopoly over the purchase of energy.

“In Georgia, we have about a dozen state policies preventing creation of solar energy,” James Marlow, vice chair of the Georgia Solar Energy Association, told IPS. “One of those is the Territorial Act.”

“If you’re looking at a school, one of the common ways [of setting up solar panels] is using a power purchase agreement or PPA,” Marlow said.

Typically, one of the biggest obstacles for businesses and organisations to switch to solar energy is the initial cost of obtaining and installing the panels. A PPA allows a school system, for example, to obtain the panels for no cost from a solar installation company which finances the panels.

Then, the school can purchase the energy from the solar installation company, which would own the panels, for a 20-year period. Marlow said that a PPA client typically pays for the panels after the first five years and then saves money on energy for the next 15, all the while avoiding the use of dirty energy.

However, because of Georgia’s Territorial Act, individuals, organisations, and businesses with solar panels can only sell their energy to Georgia Power. This means they cannot enter a PPA with a solar installation company and may have difficulty affording the panels in the first place.

Other states like Colorado have taken a different approach to encourage the use of solar panels. They charge all energy customers 50 cents a month, a very low amount, to support the purchase of solar energy from producers.

Read the rest

Hat tip to Doug’s Dynamic Drivel