Tag Archive for twin peaks

Dangerously Exploitative

bad_idea_sign_crossbonesThe new mall plan looks DOA to me.  Basically, we are replacing Dillard’s with Sam’s Club, aka Walmart.  Why does Longmont need 3 Walmarts?

And what small businesses will want to be in the same mall as Walmart?  Why cozy up with people who will undercut small business prices?

And by the way, it’s not “at the peaks,” which are quite far away.  A confusing name that pretends to be something that it is not, but then the whole project could be seen in the same light.

The stores that Newmark Merrill has in mind are not bringing new kinds of business to Longmont.  On the contrary, they are aggressively overlapping with stores on Hover and Ken Pratt that have proven they can do business here.  The mall’s intent is to siphon off that business, not develop new business.

The TIF (tax incremental financing) is what the developer is looking to pocket, and reaping all these tax dollars will also give them the upper hand in undercutting the prices of the existing stores they seek to undermine.  That’s not a productive way to do business.  It is basically parasitic.  And very NON competitive.  It will use TIF to destroy what are now viable businesses, and will only replace them with a cheaper version.  If you think Twin Peaks Mall has succumbed to urban blight, wait ‘til you see what Hover and Ken Pratt will look like in 5-10 years.

Big box abandonment will be pervasive.  Or Longmont City Council will be dishing even more TIF money in an attempt to save them.

This is a poisonous project and NM should be kicked out of here.  It is self-destructive for Longmont to continue with this plan.

And don’t you look forward to 25 different versions of “Planet of the Apes” in stadium seating.  And then you can enjoy “patio dining” in the low-budget fast food court in 100 degree weather (or about 20 in winter) –cheaper by far since there’s no need for cooling or heating.

That the new mall will restore Longmont’s reputation as the armpit of Boulder  County is really the least of our problems.  This is a financially unsound plan, designed to benefit the developer and not the city or residents.  It will damage Longmont very seriously.  Longmont’s tax dollars would be far better spent in redeveloping Main Street, Kimbark, and Coffman.

Council Not Serving Citizens

Katie Witt, poster girl for council's confusion.

Katie Witt, poster girl for council’s confusion.

Longmont City Council seems to be floundering again on city planning.  It’s a familiar story.  They cozy up to a company that wants to have its own way completely in what it does to Longmont.  Whether it is oil companies or mall developers, they make deals that do not reflect the thoughts or preferences of the people of Longmont.  Then they paper it over simply by declaring that their own bizarre decisions are “what the people want,” or “what the people have asked for.”  Listen up, City Council!  The people of Longmont didn’t ask for fracking wells in the city, or fracking wells surrounding Union Reservoir, but it took a public referendum and official vote to make that clear to the Longmont City Council.   Even so, the City Council seems less than enthusiastic about enforcing the ban on drilling that the people’s vote now mandates.  Instead of listening to the residents of Longmont, the City Council seems distressed at the thought of conducting themselves as the representatives of the people who elected them.

The recent disputes about how to redevelop Twin Peaks Mall involve tactics that are similar to the push for sweetheart deals with the oil companies.   City Council members have again shown their eagerness to bend over because the failed cinema wants to extend its failures into the future by using Longmont tax dollars. The existing mall has only one major survivor at this point, a large department store that found a way to stay in business, despite the disastrous mismanagement of the mall.   And what does City Council want to do with it?  Taking a wrecking ball to it, of course, and declare that this is what the people have asked for.  On the contrary, the people have already voted with their dollars to keep this department store.  There is no other store like it in Longmont, and no other store with their survivor skills in today’s market.  You’d think the City Council would be consulting the department store about what would be needed for a viable mall.  Instead, they have courted one of the worst cinema chains, whose appeal is largely to teenagers and small children, and made this the cornerstone of their redevelopment.  This theater habitually screens the cinematic equivalent of fast food.  There are other cinema chains that would be far better choices for redeveloping the mall.  Boulder has found them and so has Denver.  Why can’t the City Council take its blinders off and do the same?  Do they really think that the weekly allowance of twelve year olds is what it takes to make a new mall financially viable?

And aren’t these the same Council members who moaned and complained about the expense of law suits when it came to standing up for citizen’s rights against the encroachments of oil companies?  Now they have decided to initiate legal action to try to condemn the only viable store at the present mall.  This strategy seems like a very long shot, and a ridiculous misuse of Longmont tax dollars.  It will cause serious delays in the mall redevelopment and will drive away many new tenants who might otherwise want to be in Longmont.

If the deal with the current cinema can’t get the wrecking ball, then choose something else for another anchor.  Why not revitalize the conference center, and give it more variety and visibility in the possible uses for it.  Add a performance hall to it, for example, like the one that Arvada has.   Put a new multiplex cinema on Hover or Ken Pratt Blvd or upper Main St. or Pace St.  Apparently the present cinema only has a deal for the present location.  The cinema for Longmont could easily be relocated, and could attract a film distributor that would provide us with much more variety and quality.  And finally, why rebuild the entire mall when only parts of it need to be changed?  Has City Council never heard of remodeling?

The City Council needs to change its approach, and in fact put the needs of residents first in their considerations, not last.  Longmont residents have shown that they will not stand for a flagrant misuse of tax dollars to underwrite sweetheart deals with companies that have no interest in the well-being of Longmont.